Double Vision: Review

Double Vision: Review

lil louis.jpg

Stepping out from the air-conditioned comfort of our rideshare, the humid air quickly sets the theme for what is about to be a sweltering session of house music’s finest producers. It’s our first time visiting Yours&Mine in the inner northern suburb of Carlton, one of Melbourne’s newest 24-hour clubs. After only six short months, Yours&Mine has quickly gained a reputation for throwing wild, inclusive, well-booked parties.

Stepping into the unassuming black Victorian-era building, you’re welcomed by sunken lounges, a stretched bar, and the main dance floor featuring a large vaulted ceiling, and a fresh AV system courtesy of Full Throttle Entertainment. The always-excellent Melbourne veteran DJ JNETT was winding up her set downstairs, however it’s upstairs where our night was to really begin.

Ascending the stairs past the smoker’s floor, groups can be seen clinging to the open barred windows as the cool change slowly creeps inside the club. Another flight of stairs into a red-lit room and an immense wall of heat hits hard. It’s like stepping into a furnace. Through the crowd, Laurence Guy wipes the sweat from his brow with a bemused smirk on his face.

Although it’s akin to dancing in the centre of hell, it’s not enough to deter fans from Laurence Guy’s infectious mix of ambient, jazz, lo-fi electronica and house. Ataxia’s ‘Acid Overlook (Terrence Parker & Merachka Instrumental Remix)’ and the timeless classic ‘Together’ from DJ Falcon & Thomas Bangalter forces a gaudy display of chest from many in the crowd, myself included.

Venturing downstairs, faint blue lights illuminate the dance floor as circulated air provides a stark contrast to upstairs. Opting to keep the floor to ceiling projections switched off, Lil Louis, the ‘Founding Father of House Music’, can be seen bent over his mixer, dancing shirtless and just as energetically as anyone in the crowd. Looking at Louis’ slender build, it’s easy to forget that his first single was released 40 years ago. Compared to upstairs, Louis keeps his set more techno, presumably an intentional set-up for his closing track sample ‘Is it house? Or is it techno?’ from his own movie ‘The House That Chicago Built’. Ascending the stairs again and re-entering the sweatbox, the shirtless DJ theme continues with French’s finest Folamour now at the helm.

The crowd smiles and pulses as Folamour gives love to fellow Lyon producer Voilaaa’s ‘Spies Are Watching Me (Feat. Sir Jean)’. However, when Folamour drops his killer sample of Earth Wind and Fire’s ‘Devotion’ from his self-produced track ‘Devoted To U’, an ear-to-ear grin is instantly present on everyone. Although the party continues for many, the promise of cool air draws our group outside, giving us time to reflect on the amazing atmosphere Yours&Mine has curated. 

Nowhere on the dancefloor can a phone be seen – a request from the event organisers that was well respected by everyone. This move is something that future organisers and patrons should consider. Shazam and video recording can prove invaluable tools for determining tunes, but it often distracts from the moment you’re living. Alternatively, relying on the collective knowledge of friends and the solid banter that follows the conclusion of an event is more rewarding.

With the closure or soon to be closure of boutique late nightclubs such the Mercat, Hugs&Kisses and Lounge it’s easy to dismay. However, there is hope if the team behind Yours&Mine keep exceeding expectations of what a Melbourne club should be.

47461157_737204929947089_5381886530635694080_n.jpg
Interview: Horatio Luna

Interview: Horatio Luna

Music Migration: Jonahlo

Music Migration: Jonahlo